How do I know if CHP is right for my building?  

  RSS

robbluther
(@robbluther)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1
18/06/2018 4:34 pm  

For CHP to be economical for me, how large does my commercial building need to be?  Does it matter?  How do I begin to evaluate any ROI on this technology?


Quote
Eric Burgis
(@ericb)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 4
18/06/2018 5:20 pm  

Combined Heat & Power(CHP) works best in a building or facility that can utilize the heat produced while generating electricity.  This website is full of useful information and resources such as a simple payback and life cycle cost calculator located at:  https://understandingchp.com/resources/payback-tool/  .  


ReplyQuote
Eric Burgis
(@ericb)
Member Admin
Joined: 4 years ago
Posts: 4
18/06/2018 6:06 pm  

Generally speaking, the larger the facility, the lower the installed cost per kW of CHP.  But more important than size is the ability to use the waste heat generated from the CHP system.  Using grid electric at an average efficiency of 32% coupled with an 80% efficient boiler for heating nets an overall energy efficiency under 50% for you today.  CHP systems that can use the waste heat can have system efficiencies from 75% to 90%.  The more waste heat that is used, the greater your system efficiency.  So its more important to have a use for the waste heat year round than the size of the building.


ReplyQuote
daled
(@daled)
New Member
Joined: 1 year ago
Posts: 1
28/09/2018 6:35 pm  

I have always been a firm believer in the "thermal load following" approach. However, there have been so many developments in technology and tariff structure that are pushing the envelope recently. More and more potential customers are asking about standby capability coupled with demand management programs tied to CHP. There are very efficient systems that do an excellent job with load following and part load efficiency. (InVerde -over 32% electrical efficiency from 100% load all the way down to 40-50% load) This open up new possibilities.

Customers and partners are even asking about pure electric generation savings based on "spark spread". (regardless of heat recovery) This has always been a very slippery slope, because as soon as you start rejecting heat for any significant portion of run time, you sacrifice total efficiency. Once you stop recovering heat altogether, you are no more efficient than the central power plants. (Less efficient due to size and scale)

At the end of the day, it is the customer's money and we are only here to advise them on best, most efficient practices. If you add Battery Storage into the mix there are a whole host of other possibilities. Curious about what others have seen in regards to this shift over the past several years.


ReplyQuote
Share:

From the CHP Blog…

Understanding CHP and the Cost of Installation

A growing desire to conserve and preserve the environment, combined with the ever-present desire to cut costs and improve efficiency, has organizations in every industry considering alternatives to conventional electrical and thermal energy production. In addition to...

Share This

Please Login or Register